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Georgetown, Washington D.C.

by Olesia January 21 2013, 15:20 USA travel Georgetown Washington

     Georgetown is a neighborhood in Washington D.C. which is popular for its high-end shopping and dining (it has more than 450 places to shop and dine), quaint 18th century rowhouses on cobblestone streets, rowdy collegiate nightlife, waterfront harbor, and Georgetown University. It also has some of the most historical attractions in Washington, D.C., as well as the embassies of France, Mongolia, Sweden, Thailand, Venezuela, and Ukraine. Georgetown is, in fact, older than the rest of D.C. It is one of the prettiest areas of D.C., and it's best explored by foot. Most of Georgetown's streets are lined with tall, old trees and quaint 18th-19th century architecture so we literally felt as if we were in good old Europe there.

     Founded in 1751 as a port, Georgetown predates Washington, and it remained a separate city from Washington until 1871. As a port city it was an important center of Mid-Atlantic trade, particularly for tobacco and slaves. In 1789 Georgetown University was founded.

     Thomas Jefferson and Francis Scott Key both lived in Georgetown, and George Washington came over often for the booze. As the city of Washington grew, the Anglo-elite moved to newer homes in the fast growing city, turning Georgetown into somewhat of an African-American neighborhood.

     In the late nineteenth century Georgetown became a slum. This was all to the benefit of the modern era, however, as the local economic depression saved the area from development, thus preserving its beautiful eighteenth century houses.

      In the mid-twentieth century educated residents moved here, drawn by its proximity to the city center and especially by its old architecture. In the 1950s, then-senator John F Kennedy moved to 33rd and N St, and since everyone wanted to be at Jackie O's parties, the city's social and political elite returned to Georgetown.

      Since then Georgetown gentrified into something akin to Beverly Hills for the Capital Region. Today, Georgetown caters to a privileged, wealthy, international, powerful, and even somewhat aristocratic crowd, although the university presence preserves a unique mixture of beer-soaked college town and prosperous enclave.

      When going to Georgetown we thought we'd spend there 3-4 hours max. But atually we stayed there for the whole day and still didn't see everyting what we planned to. We enjoyed ourselves in Georgetown, that was dressed up for the holidays with marvelous holiday decorations and lighting. Also it was a pleasure to warm hands over the fire, drink a cup of hot chocolate and watch people on ice skating rink at Washington Harbour.

Georgetown, Washington D.C.
Georgetown, Washington D.C.
Georgetown, Washington D.C.
Georgetown, Washington D.C.
Georgetown, Washington D.C.
Georgetown, Washington D.C.
Georgetown, Washington D.C.
Georgetown, Washington D.C.
Georgetown, Washington D.C.
Georgetown, Washington D.C.
Georgetown, Washington D.C.
Georgetown, Washington D.C.
Georgetown, Washington D.C.
Georgetown, Washington D.C.
Georgetown, Washington D.C.
Georgetown, Washington D.C.
Georgetown, Washington D.C.
Georgetown, Washington D.C.
Georgetown, Washington D.C.
Georgetown, Washington D.C.
Georgetown, Washington D.C.
Georgetown, Washington D.C.
Georgetown, Washington D.C.
Georgetown, Washington D.C.
Georgetown, Washington D.C.
Georgetown, Washington D.C.
Georgetown, Washington D.C.
Georgetown, Washington D.C.
Georgetown, Washington D.C.
Georgetown, Washington D.C.
Georgetown, Washington D.C.

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